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June 04, 2018

Changes after WWDC 2018

After the keynote of the World Wide Developers Conference 2018, Apple updated the App Store Review Guidelines with a bunch of changes and new rules. It is clear that the theme of this update is user privacy and data protection. You can check out all the additions (marked with green) and removals (marked with red) below, but a few noteworthy changes include:

  • Apps now must clearly describe new features and changes in the “What’s New” section of the App Store. Several of the large social network companies have been using a practice where they reuse a generic update text for every release and then enable new features remotely on a per-user basis. This appears to no longer be permitted.
  • Developers are now allowed to provide time based free trials for non-subscription apps.
  • Several new rules for apps dealing with cryptocurrencies. Apps are not allowed to mine coins, but in return cryptocurrencies no longer need to be “approved”.
  • New rules for apps and games with advertising. Users now must be able to see all information used to target an ad without leaving the app.
  • New rules for apps that enable Remote Desktop access.
  • Emojis are back! Section 4.5.6 says that it is ok to use Unicode characters that render as Apple emojis inside apps and app metadata.
  • All apps must include a link to their privacy policy in the App Store Connect metadata field and within the app
  • Apps must respect the user’s permission settings and not attempt to manipulate, trick, or force people to consent to unnecessary data access. For example, apps that include the ability to post photos to a social network must not also require microphone access before allowing the user to upload photos.
  • Apps that enable sign in using a 3rd party social network must also include a mechanism to revoke social network credentials and disable data access between the app and social network from within the app.
  • There is a new Developer Code of Conduct section.

Check out all the changes yourself below.

Introduction

  • The guiding principle of the App Store is simple - we want to provide a safe experience for users to get apps and a great opportunity for all developers to be successful. We have updated the App Review Guidelines with that principle in mind. The On the following pages you will find guidelines themselves haven’t changed, but they are better organized and provide more context. On the following pages you will find guidelines arranged into five clear sections: Safety, Performance, Business, Design, and Legal. A few other points to keep in mind:

    • You are responsible for making sure everything in your app complies with these guidelines, including ad networks, analytics services, and third-party SDKs, so review and choose them carefully.

    We hope these new guidelines help you sail through the App Review process, and that approvals and rejections are more remain consistent across the board. This is a living document; new apps presenting new questions may result in new rules at any time. Perhaps your app will trigger this. We love this stuff too, and honor what you do. We're We’re really trying our best to create the best platform in the world for you to express your talents and make a living, too.

  • 1.5 Developer Information

    People need to know how to reach you with questions and support issues. Make sure your app and its Support URL includes include an easy way to reach contact you ; this is particularly important for apps that may be used in the classroom. Failure to include accurate and up-to-date contact information not only frustrates customers, but may violate the law in some countries. Also ensure that Wallet passes include valid contact information from the issuer and are signed with a dedicated certificate assigned to the brand or trademark owner of the pass.

  • 1.6 Data Security

    Apps should implement appropriate security measures to ensure proper handling of user information collected pursuant to the Apple Developer Program License Agreement and these Guidelines (see Guideline 5.1 for more information) and prevent its unauthorized use, disclosure, or access by third parties.

  • 2.3 Accurate Metadata
    • 2.3.6 Answer the age rating questions in iTunes App Store Connect honestly so that your app aligns properly with parental controls. If your app is mis-rated, customers might be surprised by what they get, or it could trigger an inquiry from government regulators. If your app includes media that requires the display of content ratings or warnings (e.g. films, music, games, etc.), you are responsible for complying with local requirements in each territory where your app is available.
    • 2.3.12 Apps must clearly describe new features and product changes in their “What’s New” text. Simple bug fixes, security updates, and performance improvements may rely on a generic description, but more significant changes must be listed in the notes.
  • 2.4 Hardware Compatibility
    • 2.4.2 Design your app to use power efficiently. Apps should not rapidly drain battery, generate excessive heat, or put unnecessary strain on device resources. Apps, including any third party advertisements displayed within them, may not run unrelated background processes, such as cryptocurrency mining.
    • 2.4.4 Apps should never suggest or require a restart of the device or modifications to system settings unrelated to the core functionality of the application. For example, don’t encourage users to turn off Wi-Fi, disable security features, etc.
    • 2.5 Software Requirements
      • 2.5.2 Apps should be self-contained in their bundles, and may not read or write data outside the designated container area, nor may they download, install, or execute code which introduces or changes features or functionality of the app, including other apps.
      • 2.5.11 SiriKit and Shortcuts
        • (i) Apps integrating SiriKit and Shortcuts should only sign up for intents they can handle without the support of an additional app and that users would expect from the stated functionality. For example, if your app is a meal planning app, you should not incorporate an intent to start a workout, even if the app shares integration with a fitness app.
        • (ii) Ensure that the vocabulary and phrases in your plist pertains to your app and the SiriKit Siri functionality of the intents the app has registered for. Aliases must relate directly to your app or company name and should not be generic terms or include third party app names or services.
        • (iii) Resolve the Siri request or Shortcut in the most direct way possible and do not insert ads or other marketing between the request and its fulfillment. Only present interstitial UI request a disambiguation when required to complete the task (e.g. asking the user to specify a particular type of workout).
      • 2.5.13 Apps using facial recognition for account authentication must use LocalAuthentication (and not ARKit or other facial recognition technology) where possible, and must use an alternate authentication method for users under 13 years old.
      • 2.5.14 Apps must request explicit user consent and provide a clear visual indication when recording, logging, or otherwise making a record of user activity. This includes any use of the device camera, microphone, or other user inputs.
      • 2.5.15 Apps that enable users to view and select files should include items from the Files app and the user’s iCloud documents.
    • 3.1 Payments
      • 3.1.1 In-App Purchase:
        • If you want to unlock features or functionality within your app, (by way of example: subscriptions, in-game currencies, game levels, access to premium content, or unlocking a full version), you must use in-app purchase. Apps may not use their own mechanisms to unlock content or functionality, such as license keys, augmented reality markers, QR codes, etc. Apps and their metadata may not include buttons, external links, or other calls to action that direct customers to purchasing mechanisms other than in-app purchase currencies to enable customers to “tip” digital content providers in the app. Apps and their metadata may not include buttons, external links, or other calls to action that direct customers to purchasing mechanisms other than in-app purchase.
        • Apps may use in-app purchase currencies to enable customers to “tip” digital content providers in the app.
        • Non-subscription apps may offer a free time-based trial period before presenting a full unlock option by setting up a Non-Consumable IAP item at Price Tier 0 that follows the naming convention: “XX-day Trial.” Prior to the start of the trial, your app must clearly identify its duration, the content or services that will no longer be accessible when the trial ends, and any downstream charges the user would need to pay for full functionality. Learn more about managing content access and the duration of the trial period using Receipts and Device Check .
      • 3.1.2(a) Permissible uses:
          Auto-renewing subscription apps may offer a free trial period to customers by providing the relevant information set forth in App Store Connect. Apps that attempt to trick users into purchasing a subscription under false pretenses or engage in bait-and-switch practices will be removed from the App Store and you may be removed from the Apple Developer Program. Learn more about Subscription Free Trials .
      • 3.1.3 (a) “Reader” Apps: Apps may allow a user to access previously purchased content or content subscriptions (specifically: magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, video, access to professional databases, VoIP, cloud storage, and approved services such as educational classroom management apps that manage student grades and schedules), as well as provided that you agree not to directly or indirectly target iOS users to use a purchasing method other than in-app purchase, and your general communications about other purchasing methods are not designed to discourage use of in-app purchase.
      • 3.1.3(b) Multiplatform Services: Apps that operate across multiple platforms may allow users to access content, subscriptions, or features they have acquired elsewhere, including consumable items in multi-platform games, provided that you agree not to directly or indirectly target iOS users to use a purchasing method other than those items are also available as in-app purchases within the app. You must not directly or indirectly target iOS users to use a purchasing method other than in-app purchase, and your general communications about other purchasing methods are must not designed to discourage use of in-app purchase.
      • 3.1.4 Content Codes: Hardware-Specific Content: Apps may not use their own mechanisms to unlock content or functionality, such as license keys, augmented reality markers, QR codes, etc. In limited circumstances, such as when features are dependent upon specific hardware to function, the app may unlock that functionality without using in-app purchase (e.g. an astronomy app that adds features when synced with a telescope). App features that work in combination with an approved physical product (such as a toy) on an optional basis may unlock functionality without using in-app purchase, provided that an in-app purchase option is available as well. You may not, however, require users to purchase unrelated products or engage in advertising or marketing activities to unlock app functionality.
      • 3.1.5 (a) Physical Goods and Services Outside of the App: If your app enables people to purchase goods or services that will be consumed outside of the app, you must use purchase methods other than in-app purchase to collect those payments, such as Apple Pay or traditional credit card entry.
      • 3.1.5 (b) Cryptocurrencies:
        • (i) Wallets: Apps may facilitate transmission of approved virtual currencies currency storage, provided they are offered by developers enrolled as an organization.
        • (ii) Mining: Apps may not mine for cryptocurrencies unless the processing is performed off device (e.g. Bitcoin cloud-based mining).
        • (iii) Exchanges: Apps may facilitate transactions or transmissions of cryptocurrency on an approved exchange , DogeCoin provided they are offered by the exchange itself.
        • (iv) provided that they do so in compliance with all state and federal laws for the territories in which the app functions. Initial Coin Offerings: Apps facilitating Initial Coin Offerings (“ICOs”), cryptocurrency futures trading, and other crypto-securities or quasi-securities trading must come from established banks, securities firms, futures commission merchants (“FCM”), or other approved financial institutions and must comply with all applicable law.
        • (v) Cryptocurrency apps may not offer currency for completing tasks, such as downloading other apps, encouraging other users to download, posting to social networks, etc.
      • 3.1.7 Advertising: Ads displayed in an app must be appropriate for the app’s age rating, allow the user to see all information used to target them for that ad (without requiring the user to leave the app), and may not engage in targeted or behavioral advertising based on sensitive user data such as health/medical data (e.g. from the HealthKit APIs), school and classroom data (e.g. from ClassKit), or from kids (e.g. from apps in the Kids Category), etc. Interstitial ads or ads that interrupt or block the user experience must clearly indicate that they are an ad, must not manipulate or trick users into tapping into them, and must provide easily accessible and visible close/skip buttons large enough for people to easily dismiss the ad.
    • 3.2 Other Business Model Issues
      • 3.2.2 Unacceptable
        • (ix) Apps must not force users to rate the app, review the app, download other apps, or perform other similar actions in order to access functionality, content, or use of the app.
    • 4.2 Minimum Functionality
      • 4.2.3
        • (i) Your app should work on its own without requiring installation of another app to function.
        • (ii) Make sure you include sufficient content in the binary for the app to function at launch.
        • (iii) If your app needs to download additional resources, disclose the size of the download and prompt users before doing so. Existing apps must comply with this guideline in any update submitted after January 1, 2019.
      • 4.2.7 Remote Application Mirroring: If your remote desktop app acts as a mirror of specific software or services rather than a generic mirror of the host device, it must comply with the following:
        • (a) The host device is a personal computer owned by the user, and both the host and client must be connected on a local and LAN-based network.
        • (b) Any software or services appearing in the client are fully rendered on the screen of the host device, and may not use APIs or platform features beyond what is required to stream the Remote Desktop
        • (c) All account creation and management must be initiated from the host device.
        • (d) The UI appearing on the client does not resemble an iOS or App Store view, does not provide a store-like interface, or include the ability to browse, select, or purchase software not already owned or licensed by the user. For the sake of clarity, transactions taking place within mirrored software do not need to use in-app purchase, provided the transactions are processed on the host device.
    • 4.5 Apple Sites and Services
      • 4.5.4 Push Notifications must not be required for the app to function, and should not be used for advertising, promotions, or direct marketing purposes or to send sensitive personal or confidential information. Abuse of these services may result in revocation of your privileges.
      • 4.5.6 Apps may use Unicode characters that render as Apple emojis in their app and app metadata. Apple emojis may not be used on other platforms or embedded directly in your app binary.
    • 4.7 HTML5 Games, Bots, etc.

      Apps may contain or run code that is not embedded in the binary (e.g. HTML5-based games, bots, etc.), as long as code distribution isn’t the main purpose of the app, the code is not offered in a store or store-like interface, and provided that the software (1) is free or purchased using in-app purchase; (2) only uses capabilities available in a standard WebKit view; your app must use WebKit and JavaScript Core to run third party software and should not attempt to extend or expose native platform APIs to third party software; (3) is offered by developers that have joined the Apple Developer Program and signed the Apple Developer Program License Agreement; and (4) adheres to the terms of these App Review Guidelines (e.g. it must open and run natively in Safari without modifications or additional software); your app must use WebKit and JavaScript Core to run third party software and should not attempt to extend or expose native platform APIs to third party software; (3) is offered by developers that have joined the Apple Developer Program and signed the Apple Developer Program License Agreement; and (4) adheres to the terms of these App Review Guidelines (e.g. does not include objectionable content). YouUpon request, you must provide an index of software and metadata available in your app upon request. It must include Apple Developer Program Team IDs for the providers of the software along with a URL which App Review can use to confirm that the software complies with the requirements above.

    • 5.1 Privacy
      • 5.1.1 Data Collection and Storage
        • (i) Privacy Policies: All apps must include a link to their privacy policy in the App Store Connect metadata field and within the app in an easily accessible manner. The privacy policy must clearly and explicitly:
          • Identify what data, if any, the app/service collects, how it collects that data, and all uses of that data.
          • Confirm that any third party with whom an app shares user data (in compliance with these Guidelines) — such as analytics tools, advertising networks and third party SDKs, as well as any parent, subsidiary or other related entities that will have access to user data — will provide the same or equal protection of user data as stated in the app’s privacy policy and required by these Guidelines.
          • Explain its data retention/deletion policies and describe how a user can revoke consent and/or request deletion of the user’s data.
        • (ii) Permission Apps that collect user or usage data must have a privacy policy and secure user consent for the collection. This includes—but isn’t limited to—apps that implement HealthKit or other health/medical technologiesPaid functionality must not be dependent on or require a user to grant access to this data. Apps must also provide the customer with an easily accessible and understandable way to withdraw consent. Ensure your purpose strings clearly and completely describe your use of the data. Apps that collect data for a legitimate interest without consent by relying on the terms of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) or similar statute must comply with all terms of that law. Learn more about Requesting Permission.
        • (iii) Data Minimization: Apps should only request access to data relevant to the core functionality of the app and should only collect and use data that is required to accomplish the relevant task. Where possible, use the out-of-process picker or a share sheet rather than requesting full access to protected resources like Photos or Contacts.
        • (iv) Access Apps must respect the user’s permission settings and not attempt to manipulate, trick, or force people to consent to unnecessary data access. For example, apps that utilize ARKitinclude the ability to post photos to a social network must not also require microphone access before allowing the user to upload photos. Where possible, Camera APIsprovide alternative solutions for users who don’t grant consent. For example, Photo APIsif a user declines to share Location, or other software for depth of facial mappingoffer the ability to manually enter an address.
        • (v) Account Sign-In: If your app doesn’t include significant account-based features, let people use it without a log-in. Apps may not require users to enter personal information to function, HomeKit, Keyboard extensions, Apple Pay, Stickers and iMessage extensions, include a login, or access user data from the deviceexcept when directly relevant to the core functionality of the app or required by law. YourIf your core app description should let people know what types of accessfunctionality is not related to a specific social network (e.g. location, contacts, calendar, etc.) are requested by your app, and what aspects of the app won’t work if the user doesn’t grant permission. (ii) If your app doesn’t include significant account-based features, let people use it without a log-in. Apps may not require users to enter personal information to function, except when directly relevant to the core functionality of the app or required by law. If your core app functionality is not related to a specific social network (e.g. Facebook, WeChat, Weibo, Twitter, etc.), you must provide access without a login or via another mechanism. Pulling basic profile information, sharing to the social network, or inviting friends to use the app are not considered core app functionality. The app must also include a mechanism to revoke social network credentials and disable data access between the app and social network from within the app. An app may not store credentials or tokens to social networks off of the device and may only use such credentials or tokens to directly connect to the social network from the app itself while the app is in use.
        • (iiivi) Developers that use their apps to surreptitiously discover passwords or other private data will be removed from the Developer Program.
        • (ivvii) SafariViewContoller must be used to visibly present information to users; the controller may not be hidden or obscured by other views or layers. Additionally, an app may not use SafariViewController to track users without their knowledge and consent.
      • 5.1.2 Data Use and Sharing
        • (i) Unless otherwise permitted by law, you may not use, transmit, or share someone’s personal data without first obtaining their permission. You must provide access to information about how and where the data will be used. Data collected from apps may only be shared with third parties to improve the app or serve advertising (in compliance with the Apple Developer Program License Agreement.). Apps that share user data without user consent or otherwise complying with data privacy laws may be removed from sale and may result in your removal from the Apple Developer Program.
        • (ii) Data collected for one purpose may not be repurposed without further consent unless otherwise explicitly permitted by law.
        • (iii) Apps should not attempt to surreptitiously build a user profile based on collected data and may not attempt, facilitate, or encourage others to identify anonymous users or reconstruct user profiles based on data collected from depth andApple-provided APIs or any data that you say has been collected in an “anonymized,” “aggregated,” or otherwise non-identifiable way.
        • (iv) Do not use information from Contacts, Photos, or other APIs that access user data to build a contact database for your own use or for sale/or facial mapping toolsdistribution to third parties, and don’t collect information about which other apps are installed on a user’s device for the purposes of analytics or advertising/marketing.
        • (v) Do not contact people using information collected via a user’s Contacts or Photos, except at the explicit initiative of that user on an individualized basis; do not include a Select All option or default the selection of all contacts. You must provide the user with a clear description of how the message will appear to the recipient before sending it (e.g. ARKit, Camera APIs, or Photo APIsWhat will the message say? Who will appear to be the sender?), or data that you say has been collected in an “anonymized,” “aggregated,” or otherwise non-identifiable way. You may not use or transmit someone’s personal data without first obtaining their permission and providing access to information about how and where the data will be used.
        • (iivi) Data collected from apps may not be used or shared with third parties for purposes unrelated to improving the user experience or softwaregathered from the HomeKit API, HealthKit, Consumer Health Records API, MovementDisorder APIs, ClassKit or from depth and/hardware performance connected to the app’s functionality, or to serve advertising in compliance with the Apple Developer Program License Agreement. (iii) Data gathered from the HomeKit API or from depth and/or facial mapping tools (e.g. ARKit, Camera APIs, or Photo APIs) may not be used for marketing, advertising or other use-based data mining, including by third parties. Learn more about best practices for implementing CallKit, HealthKit, ClassKit, and ARKit.
        • (ivvii) Apps using Apple Pay may only share user data acquired via Apple Pay with third parties to facilitate or improve delivery of goods and services.
      • 5.1.4 Kids

        For many reasons, it is critical to use care when dealing with personal data from kids, and we encourage you to carefully review all the requirements for complying with laws like the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”), the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), and any international or local equivalents.

    • 5.4 VPN Apps

      Apps offering VPN services must utilize the NEVPNManager API API andand may only be offered by developers enrolled as an organization. You must make a clear declaration of what user data will be collected and how it will be used. VPN apps must not violate local laws, and if you choose to make your VPN app available in a territory that requires a VPN license, you must provide your license information in the App Review Notes field.

    • 5.5 Developer Code of Conduct

      Please treat everyone with respect, whether in your responses to App Store reviews, customer support requests, or when communicating with Apple, including your responses in Resolution Center. Do not engage in harassment of any kind, discriminatory practices, intimidation, bullying, and don’t encourage others to engage in any of the above.

      Customer trust is the cornerstone of the App Store’s success. Apps should never prey on users or attempt to rip-off customers, trick them into making unwanted purchases, force them to share unnecessary data, raise prices in a tricky manner, charge for features or content that are not delivered, or engage in any other manipulative practices within or outside of the app.